Personal explorations of qualitative research in testing

One book I read a while ago from the office’s library is about qualitative research. It’s called ‘Reliability and validity in qualitative research’, by Jerome Kirk and Marc L. Miller.
It sounds fancy and scientific, and it has not been an easy read for me, but I really enjoyed it.
I find it full of great ideas, containing some very consistent examples and discussing ways in which qualitative research can be performed, as well as identifying some really interesting aspects of this approach, with relation to social sciences and anthropology. But I do not intend to review this book.

I’ll try to discuss how I find that some ideas in the book apply to my testing activities. As I read along the pages, I made some thought exercises and tried to identify how my work relates to the ideas presented.

As the title of the book suggests, its framework is given by the reliability problem and the validity problem that arise when performing qualitative research. I instantly related these two problems to…

Emacs Python IDE Recipe

My initial goal was to set up Emacs, in the simplest way possible, as a Python development environment that offers basic code browsing and code completion.

This might not be the brightest way to get the job done, and I am open to suggestions, but for now this works just fine for me.

“Ingredients”

Help us get to EuroSTAR!

We entered a video competition to win tickets to EuroSTAR 2012! We made a short documentary about the newly discovered testerus sapiens (played by us) as they go about their daily lives. They are presented in their natural habitat, the jungles of software development, where they test software either as a group or alone, living for the thrill of the bug-hunt…

How to use an iPhone packaging box to make an iPhone testing sled

While testing an iPhone application that is part of a bigger solution developed by teams in different locations, I came across a few issues that made me look into some of the available options for recording the application in use on a real iPhone and I decided to try to build my own testing sled using parts I already had around the office. It turned out that the original iPhone packaging had everything I needed.

My BBST experience – the musings of a student

This is an account of some of the activities I wish I had focused more on during the one-month Foundations course. The article is peppered with nostalgia for my fellow students and the activities we did together, but it ends with something awesome to look forward to: signing up for Bug Advocacy, the second part of the BBST course…

RoWST – Romanian Workshop on Software Testing

Last year, together with Catalin Anastasoaie, we started a series of one-day events under the umbrella of Tabara de Testare (“TdT”) with the purpose of building a testing community in Romania. It was a very interesting experience that helped us meet clever and skillful people from Bucuresti, Iasi, Cluj and Timisoara willing to share their experiences and learn from the community.

Rapid Software Testing with James Bach in Bucharest

This one goes to all passionate testers out here: don’t make any plans for 26 -28 March 2012, as James Bach will be back in Bucharest teaching the martial art of rapid testing. So, get yourself ready for 3 days of intensive training, challenging discussions and mind-warping puzzles…

Exploratory testing – a rookie’s thoughts (part 3)

Q: What other testing activities have you done besides pair testing?

 

A: Well, we also did something I named parallel testing, which involves less teamwork but can be just as engaging as pair testing. I’ll try to explain what this means using a similar analogy I used for pair testing. I compared pair testing to a car ride, where one tester is the driver, while the other is a passenger in the same car. Parallel testing is similar, with both testers being drivers (both with their own keyboard/computer), in slightly different cars (this can vary between using different browsers/OSs/computer configurations), driving parallel to each other (testing the same piece of software/section of application), with a communication link between them (both testers are within earshot of each other – in same office or room)…